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The Northern Rockies : a fire survey / Stephen J. Pyne.

By: Pyne, Stephen J, 1949- [author.].
Series: Pyne, Stephen J., To the last smoke: v. 3.Publisher: Tucson : University of Arizona Press, 2016Description: x, 144 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780816533510 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0816533512 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Wildfires -- Rocky Mountains -- History | Wildfires -- Montana -- History | Wildfires -- Idaho -- History | Wildfires -- Rocky Mountains -- Prevention and control -- History | Wildfires -- Montana -- Prevention and control -- History | Wildfires -- Idaho -- Prevention and control -- History | Forest fires -- Rocky Mountains -- History | Forest fires -- Montana -- History | Forest fires -- Idaho -- History | Forest fires -- Rocky Mountains -- Prevention and control -- History | Forest fires -- Montana -- Prevention and control -- History | Forest fires -- Idaho -- Prevention and control -- History
Contents:
Prologue: where the mountains roar -- Portal: Lolo Pass -- The Missoula matrix -- Why Boise is not the national center for fire -- The paradoxes of wilderness fire -- Fire's call of the wild -- Fire by parallax -- The embers will find a way -- Portal: gates of the mountains -- Young men, old men, and fire -- How I came to Mann Gulch -- What makes a fire significant? -- The big blowup -- The second big blowup -- The other big burn -- Epilogue: the Northern Rockies between two fires.
Summary: "The Northern Rockies is part of the multivolume series describing the nation's fire scene region by region. The volumes in To the Last Smoke also cover Florida, the Northern Rockies, the Great Plains, the Southwest, and several other critical fire regions"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "It's a place of big skies and big fires, big burns like those of 1910 and 1988 that riveted national attention. Conflagrations like those of 1934 and 2007 that reformed national policy. Blowups like that in Mann Gulch that shaped the literature of American fire. Big fires mostly hidden in the backcountry like the Fitz Creek and Howler fires that inspired the practice of managed wildfires. Until the fire revolution of the 1960s, no region so shaped the American way of fire. The Northern Rockies remain one of three major hearths for America's fire culture. They hold a major fire laboratory, an equipment development center, an aerial fire depot, and a social engagement with fire--even a literature. Missoula is to fire in the big backcountry what Tallahassee is to prescribed burning and what Southern California is to urban-wildland hybrids. On its margins, Boise hosts the National Interagency Fire Center. In this structured collection of essays on the region, Stephen J. Pyne explores what makes the Northern Rockies distinctive and what sets it apart from other regions of the country. Surprisingly, perhaps, the story is equally one of big bureaucracies and of generations that encounter the region's majestic landscapes through flame." -- Publisher's description
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Item holds
BOOK BOOK Foothills Lab SD421.32.R62 P96 2016 (Browse shelf) Available
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Prologue: where the mountains roar -- Portal: Lolo Pass -- The Missoula matrix -- Why Boise is not the national center for fire -- The paradoxes of wilderness fire -- Fire's call of the wild -- Fire by parallax -- The embers will find a way -- Portal: gates of the mountains -- Young men, old men, and fire -- How I came to Mann Gulch -- What makes a fire significant? -- The big blowup -- The second big blowup -- The other big burn -- Epilogue: the Northern Rockies between two fires.

"The Northern Rockies is part of the multivolume series describing the nation's fire scene region by region. The volumes in To the Last Smoke also cover Florida, the Northern Rockies, the Great Plains, the Southwest, and several other critical fire regions"-- Provided by publisher.

"It's a place of big skies and big fires, big burns like those of 1910 and 1988 that riveted national attention. Conflagrations like those of 1934 and 2007 that reformed national policy. Blowups like that in Mann Gulch that shaped the literature of American fire. Big fires mostly hidden in the backcountry like the Fitz Creek and Howler fires that inspired the practice of managed wildfires. Until the fire revolution of the 1960s, no region so shaped the American way of fire. The Northern Rockies remain one of three major hearths for America's fire culture. They hold a major fire laboratory, an equipment development center, an aerial fire depot, and a social engagement with fire--even a literature. Missoula is to fire in the big backcountry what Tallahassee is to prescribed burning and what Southern California is to urban-wildland hybrids. On its margins, Boise hosts the National Interagency Fire Center. In this structured collection of essays on the region, Stephen J. Pyne explores what makes the Northern Rockies distinctive and what sets it apart from other regions of the country. Surprisingly, perhaps, the story is equally one of big bureaucracies and of generations that encounter the region's majestic landscapes through flame." -- Publisher's description

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