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Fresh banana leaves : healing indigenous landscapes through indigenous science / Jessica Hernandez, PhD.

By: Publisher: Huichin, unceded Ohlone land aka Berkeley, California : North Atlantic Books, 2022Copyright date: 2022Description: 260 pages : illustrations ; 23 cmContent type:
  • text
Media type:
  • unmediated
Carrier type:
  • volume
ISBN:
  • 9781623176051
  • 1623176050
Other title:
  • Healing indigenous landscapes through indigenous science [Portion of title]
Subject(s): Additional physical formats: Online version:: Fresh banana leavesDDC classification:
  • 304.2082 23
LOC classification:
  • GE195.9 .H47 2022
  • GE195.9.H47 F74 2022
  • GN476.7 .H47 2022
Contents:
Introduction -- Indigenous teaching: nature protects you as long as you protect nature -- Ecocolonialism of indigenous landscapes -- Birth of Western conservation -- Indigenous science: indigenous stewardship and management of lands -- Ecowars: seeking environmental justice -- Tierra Madre: indigenous women & ecofeminism -- Ancestral foods: cooking with fresh banana leaves -- Indigenizing conservation: healing indigenous landscapes.
Summary: An Indigenous environmental scientist breaks down why Western conservationism isn't working--and offers Indigenous models informed by case studies, historical overviews, and stories that center the voices of Latin American women and land protectors. Despite the fact that Indigenous communities are among the most affected by climate devastation, Indigenous science is nowhere to be found in mainstream environmental policy or discourse. And while holistic land, water, and forest management practices born from millennial of Indigenous knowledge systems have much to teach all of us, Indigenous science has long been ignored, otherized, or perceived as "soft" -- the product of a systematic, centuries-long campaign of racism, colonialism, and extractive capitalism. Jessica Hernandez--a Maya Ch'orti' and Zapotec environmental scientist and founder of environmental agency Piña Soul--introduces and contextualizes Indigenous environmental knowledge and proposes a vision of land stewardship that heals rather than displaces, that generates rather than destroys. She breaks down the failures of Western-defined conservationism and shares alternatives, citing the restoration work of urban Indigenous people in Seattle; her family's fight against eco-terrorism in Latin America; and holistic land management approaches of Indigenous groups across the continent. If we're to recover the health of our planet--for everyone--we need to stop the eco-colonialism ravaging Indigenous lands and restore our relationships with Earth to one of harmony and respect. -- From back cover.
List(s) this item appears in: Project management
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
BOOK BOOK NCAR Library Mesa Lab GE195.9 .H47 2022 1 Available 50583020020420
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages [243]-256) and index.

Introduction -- Indigenous teaching: nature protects you as long as you protect nature -- Ecocolonialism of indigenous landscapes -- Birth of Western conservation -- Indigenous science: indigenous stewardship and management of lands -- Ecowars: seeking environmental justice -- Tierra Madre: indigenous women & ecofeminism -- Ancestral foods: cooking with fresh banana leaves -- Indigenizing conservation: healing indigenous landscapes.

An Indigenous environmental scientist breaks down why Western conservationism isn't working--and offers Indigenous models informed by case studies, historical overviews, and stories that center the voices of Latin American women and land protectors. Despite the fact that Indigenous communities are among the most affected by climate devastation, Indigenous science is nowhere to be found in mainstream environmental policy or discourse. And while holistic land, water, and forest management practices born from millennial of Indigenous knowledge systems have much to teach all of us, Indigenous science has long been ignored, otherized, or perceived as "soft" -- the product of a systematic, centuries-long campaign of racism, colonialism, and extractive capitalism. Jessica Hernandez--a Maya Ch'orti' and Zapotec environmental scientist and founder of environmental agency Piña Soul--introduces and contextualizes Indigenous environmental knowledge and proposes a vision of land stewardship that heals rather than displaces, that generates rather than destroys. She breaks down the failures of Western-defined conservationism and shares alternatives, citing the restoration work of urban Indigenous people in Seattle; her family's fight against eco-terrorism in Latin America; and holistic land management approaches of Indigenous groups across the continent. If we're to recover the health of our planet--for everyone--we need to stop the eco-colonialism ravaging Indigenous lands and restore our relationships with Earth to one of harmony and respect. -- From back cover.

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